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Arts for Conservation Night A School of Natural Resources Community Engagement event

Date: Time: 6:00 pm–8:30 pm
Hardin Hall Room: Auditorium (107)
Additional Info: HARH
Contact: Shawna Richter-Ryerson, 402-472-6515, shawna@unl.edu
LINCOLN — The School of Natural Resources is hosting an Arts for Conservation Night, featuring “Time and the River,” the Platte River Timelapse Project, and community conservation art, beginning at 6 p.m. Thursday, Nov. 21, 2019, in Hardin Hall, 3310 Holdrege St. The community engagement event, as well as parking, are free.

The event will open with a gallery-style show, featuring conservation and scientific photography, video, drawings and more. The show will be followed by a viewing at 7 p.m. of “Time and the River,” a multi-media work of chamber music and Platte River Timelapse photography. A panel discussion about arts and conservation will follow with Bob Kuzelka, Lincoln Friends of Chamber Music president and former SNR associate professor; and Michael Forsberg, Mike Farrell, and Mariah Lungren, of the Platte River TImelapse Project.

“Artists have always been inspired by nature and have used art to compel people to create change in the world,” said Shawna Richter-Ryerson, SNR Community Engagement member. “This is our attempt at bringing together arts of all kinds to share that message and build a conversation around conservation, a topic important to our School’s mission.

Those attending the Arts for Conservation Night will have the opportunity to see art created to inspire conservation practices and art created solely for scientific discovery. They will experience hyper-pigmented aerial photographs taken to document plant health; X-ray-like images that reveal how humans have left their mark on earth, the Oregon Trail ruts revealed beneath vegetation; drawings made with soils; historic maps; conservation photography; multimedia pieces; music and more.

“We hope people walk away from our Arts for Conservation Night inspired by the way the two very different disciplines complement one another,” Richter-Ryerson said, “and how, when used together, art and science foster a greater appreciation for our natural world, which we depend on.”

Additional Public Info:
https://newsroom.unl.edu/announce/snr/10257/61070

https://newsroom.unl.edu/announce/snr/10257/61070

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