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Robert A. Gross: “The Transcendentalists and Their World”

Date: Time: 5:00 pm–6:30 pm
Andrews Hall Room: Bailey Library
Additional Info: ANDR
Contact: Matt Cohen, matt.cohen@unl.edu
A native of Bridgeport, Connecticut, Robert A. Gross received the B.A. in American civilization from the University of Pennsylvania in 1966 and the M.A. (1968) and Ph.D. (1976) in history from Columbia University. He taught at Amherst College (1976-88), the University of Sussex (1981-83) and the College of William and Mary (1988-2003) before coming to UConn. He is the recipient of various national awards, including fellowships from the Guggenheim, Howard, and Rockefeller Foundations, the National Endowment for the Humanities, and the American Antiquarian Society.

Prof. Gross specializes in the social and cultural history of the U.S., from the colonial era through the nineteenth century. His first book on the American Revolution, The Minutemen and Their World (1976), won the Bancroft Prize in American History; it was re-issued in a 25th anniversary edition in 2001 and will be published by Picador in a new, revised edition in 2022 to commemorate the 250th anniversary of the American Revolution. He has continued studies of the Revolutionary era in such works as In Debt to Shays: The Bicentennial of an Agrarian Rebellion (1993). For two decades he has been deeply involved in the interdisciplinary field known as the history of the book, serving on the editorial board for the multi-volume History of the Book in America published by the University of North Carolina Press and co-editing with Mary Kelley the second volume of the series, An Extensive Republic: Print, Culture, and Society in the New Nation, 1790-1840 (2010). His other recent work examines New England writers — notably, Ralph Waldo Emerson, Henry David Thoreau, and Emily Dickinson — in historical context. From that project has come his latest book, The Transcendentalists and Their World, a social and cultural history of Emerson and Thoreau and the Concord, Massachusetts community in which they lived and wrote.

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This event originated in Department of English.